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Ramona

 

Ramona seldom spoke.  It was not a specific event that caused her silence, nor was it a set of beliefs that asked her to leave things unsaid. Her silence came, in part, from shyness, but mostly from the careful cultivation of her strongest quality, prudence. Never one to waste words on chatter about the weather or topical issues, Ramona cherished her breath and was very particular about its use. Hellos and goodbyes were trite; instead she would greet with a smile. Conversations about the existence of god would never end, so she would end it with a slow blink and a turn of her head. Others often misunderstood her silence for arrogance, dullness or  her personal favorite, wisdom. Although the perception of wisdom was sometimes excessive, Ramona found delight in the naivety of those whose imaginations were left to run wild.

 

Never silent about things that mattered, Ramona kept a watchful eye for the misuse of beauty. She was a warning signal for the rest of us, blowing her piercing accusations straight into her victim’s hearts. Her intent was not to simply clue them in on the evils that existed, but to remind them of how their inaction let it continue. It would hurt your very being to listen to her aching wails, but it was hard to stop because the sound was so divine. She was a master at playing the blues.

 

The blues are cathartic, alleviating one of the blues, but Ramona had the ability to control the blues and spread the blues to those she felt certain deserved it. How she obtained these powers is a story in itself; we will concentrate on its use. Ramona was almost cruel with what she did, then again so were her victims for what they did not do. She left her listeners with little choice; stay put, enjoy the pleasing sounds she could create and struggle at having to hear the tragic message that it represented, or leave her presence and help quiet her lamentation by placing a bit of the burden on their hands. When Ramona found herself alone, she would quietly play a personal tune and know she had won at least one battle.

 

 

- Daniel Embaye